A dog’s life in Salisbury’s shops

Tilly the terrier relaxes in bed after a busy morning of research in shops and cafés.

Tilly the terrier relaxes in bed after a busy morning of research in shops and cafés.

TILLY the terrier says it’s her turn now. She has been making a fairly thorough assessment of dog-friendly places in Salisbury and is keen to share the results of her findings with other dogs who may be reading The Happy Moonraker’s postings.

Whether it is sitting next to her human in a coffee shop or supervising the odd purchases in a charity shop, Tilly takes a keen interest in what is going on. Like any other self-respecting individual, human or canine, she hates to feel unwelcome,

She has heard her human moaning that every other shop in the town these days is a café or a charity shop, but in most of them she is welcome, which is good news.

Robert Lewis, who has the Belgian chocolate shop and café in the High Street, says: “We are dog-friendly if your dog is friendly.” No problems there, then.

Still in the High Street, Tilly has been into Raffinée, the Italian shoe shop, across the road to the High Street Post Office (she isn’t allowed into the main Post Office in Castle Street, though), into the India Shop, in Boston Tea Party (upstairs and downstairs), but she is turned away, with her little tail between her legs, from Café Rouge.

She is welcome in the Trussell Trust shop and also in the British Heart Foundation shop. As you would expect, she is always warmly welcomed into the Dogs’ Trust shop in Crane Street, but she is only allowed in to the Children’s Society shop if The Happy Moonraker is handing goods in.

As Tilly’s research is extensive she thinks it would be a good idea to divide her results into separate postings. She looks forward to telling you more about the shops and cafés that she has patronised, or been turned away from. In the meantime, she is resting.

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Why are we waiting?

Tilly the terrier finds a sunny spot on the window sill while she waits for the bus in the park & ride waiting room.

Tilly the terrier finds a sunny spot on the window sill while she waits for the bus in the park & ride waiting room.

TILLY is a keen traveller but the Happy Moonraker senses that she prefers car travel to all other modes of transport. For instance, if we go by bus we first have to walk a mile and then wait for the bus to arrive.

In the car she can hop straight on to the parcel shelf and, depending on her mood, either doze or bark angrily at bicycles or postmen that are too close to the car.

 

Dog’s delight

An eye-catching display in Salisbury market, especially if you happen to be a dog.

An eye-catching display in Salisbury market, especially if you happen to be a dog.

The Happy Moonraker admires the thinking behind the marketing of these bovine leg bones on the pet food stall in Salisbury market.

After all, the sign raises a smile and this must surely generate extra sales.

The photo would have been more interesting if Tilly the terrier could have been persuaded to clamp her jaws on one of the bones, but it is doubtful that she would ever have let go. After all, postmen are high on her list of dislikes.

Sights and sounds of spring

Tilly the terrier gets digging among the bluebells.

Tilly the terrier gets digging among the bluebells.

THERE was blue sky and sunshine most of the day. Tender white narcissi with their delicate scent have taken over from the rather raucous daffodils which are dying back now. Some of the daffs are even tough enough to have coped with the occasional frost.

Hellebores, or Christmas roses if you prefer, fill corners of the garden. Plain, variegated or spotted, they range from palest cream or light green, through to pink and the darkest crimson. There have been primroses everywhere for weeks. The first bluebells are luminous blue, whether the original darker blue of the native type or the paler, more faintly scented ones of the introduced species.

Plum blossom crowds the trees in a froth of tiny white flowers, attracting bees from the nearby hives, and looking ethereal in moonlight.

Birdsong fills the air, with wrens, small though they are, trilling loudly from their hiding places. Proud blackbirds sing from the rooftops, a green woodpecker cackles from the trees. Its other name, yaffle, is just right: they do “yaffle”. A pair of Canada geese leaves the nest by the stream to forage for food before honking loudly as they return.

And then the sun disappears behind a cloud and the rain begins, becoming heavier and lasting for several hours. Silence descends.

From the window I can see blue tits as they flit along the hedgerow, protected from the rain by last year’s brown beech leaves. A tiny wren silently works lower down in the hedge, hunting for insects for the nest of young that must surely be hidden close by.

A pink and white self-sown Hellebore

A pink and white self-sown Hellebore