A corkscrew for safety

TILLY wouldn’t have fallen into the river (see below) if she had been restrained by being attached to her corkscrew.

In situations where she is likely to become over-excited and lose all common sense – which, after all, Jack Russells are good at – this simple gadget is the perfect answer, as long as care is taken to ensure that it is screwed in as far as it will go.

You just have to be careful that you don’t strike an immoveable flint just beneath the surface because, if you do, there is no choice but to find a better spot.

The special corkscrew, or tether, that is screwed into the ground, together with Tilly’s lead.

The special corkscrew, or tether, that is screwed into the ground, together with Tilly’s lead.

Tilly demonstrates how the tether works, with her lead attached to it once the metal has been screwed firmly into the ground.

Tilly demonstrates how the tether works, with her lead attached to it once the metal has been screwed firmly into the ground.

Advertisements

Tilly takes a tumble

Tilly drying off at home after falling in the river.

Tilly drying off at home after falling in the river.

POOR Tilly the terrier had a bad fright the other day: she fell into a fast-flowing river. Not only that, she fell into a section at one of the hatches that are used to control river flow, so the stone lining meant she couldn’t clamber out.

She had to swim much further than she normally does and then got stuck, trapped in the river by the stone side.

The Happy Moonraker only heard about this adventure some hours after it happened, otherwise horror and panic might have prevented me being any use at all.

As it is, Tilly was wearing her little harness as usual so it was possible to lift her out of the water with the help of a huge weed-clearing fork.

It turned out that she had fallen in because she got over-excited at the sight of a stick that she thought was being thrown for her. If only she had realised it was being pulled out of the river, not being thrown in.

She was thoroughly drenched after her ducking and, because of her thick coat, it was hours before she was fully dry again.

I don’t think she has learned a lesson because she was back there a few days later, skipping about in the same place as though nothing had happened.

How not to park

bad-parking-10-16

THE Happy Moonraker long ago realised that the world is divided into people who don’t pull the roller towel down to expose a clean section for the next person, and those who do.

It’s all a question of thoughtfulness and consideration for others.

The same can be said for parking.

Have you ever seen parking like this? Coming towards the junction from the right, how was I meant to turn left past this vehicle, without going so far into the narrow road that I was on the wrong side and likely to hit an oncoming vehicle on the blind bend ahead? To say nothing of obstructing any vehicle that might appear from my right.

It seems the Highway Code can be flouted when it is Salisbury Rugby Festival, Daddy has overslept and his little rugby player can’t be late.

Quote from the Highway Code: “The nearest you can park to a junction is 10 metres (or 32 feet). This is to allow drivers emerging from, or turning into, the junction a clear view of the road they are joining. It also allows them to see hazards such as pedestrians or cyclists at the junction.”

That sort of arrogant parking behaviour is on a par with that of people who leave their dog’s mess neatly bagged but next to the footpath or hanging in the hedge. Agreed, the offending heap has been picked up, but why assume someone else will deal with the bag?